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Bertie Wooster and Jeeves Series

Bertie Wooster is a not too bright young man-about-town who is constantly rescued from the scrapes he can’t help falling into by Jeeves his ‘gentleman’s personal gentleman.’ Wodehouse himself admitted that he had written what amounted to a Saga which included novels and short stories found in:


Books in the Bertie Wooster and Jeeves series:

The Man with Two Left Feet (1917)

A collection of short stories that first appeared in magazines such as The Strand, The Saturday Evening Post, McClure’s and Collier’s. Bertie Wooster and Jeeves make their first appearance in ‘Extricating Young Gussie.’ Read online at archive.org.

Author(s): P. G. Wodehouse
Illustrator(s): Unknown

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My Man Jeeves (1919)

A collection of short stories, four about Bertie Wooster and Jeeves. Some of the others were later re-written as Bertie and Jeeves stories. These all first appeared in The Strand, some were published in The Saturday Evening Post. Not published in America, six of the eight stories were reprinted in Carry On, Jeeves. Read online at gutenberg.org.

Author(s): P. G. Wodehouse
Illustrator(s): Unknown

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The Inimitable Jeeves (1923)

A collection of Bertie and Jeeves short stories.

Author(s): P. G. Wodehouse
Illustrator(s): Unknown

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Jeeves (1923)

A collection of short stories about Bertie Wooster and Jeeves. The scan is the Penguin Books edition. Read online at archive.org.

Author(s): P. G. Wodehouse
Illustrator(s): Unknown

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Carry On, Jeeves! (1925)

A collection of short stories about Bertie Wooster and his gentleman’s personal gentleman Jeeves.

Author(s): P. G. Wodehouse
Illustrator(s): Unknown

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Carry On, Jeeves! (1927)

A collection of short stories about Bertie Wooster and his gentleman’s personal gentleman Jeeves.

Author(s): P. G. Wodehouse
Illustrator(s): None

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Very Good, Jeeves (1930)

Eleven short stories in which Jeeves exerts his powers to rescue the young master, Bertie Wooster, and his friends and relatives from various predicaments, chiefly matrimonial.

Author(s): P. G. Wodehouse
Illustrator(s): James Montgomery Flagg

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Very Good, Jeeves (1930)

Eleven short stories in which Jeeves exerts his powers to rescue the young master, Bertie Wooster, and his friends and relatives from various predicaments, chiefly matrimonial.

Author(s): P. G. Wodehouse
Illustrator(s): Clare Roberts

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Jeeves Omnibus (1931)

Includes stories from Jeeves (The Inimitable Jeeves), Carryon, Jeeves!, and Very Good, Jeeves (!).

Author(s): P. G. Wodehouse
Illustrator(s): Abbey

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Nothing But Wodehouse (1932)

A compendium of Wodehouse, including selections from Jeeves, Very Good Jeeves, He Rather Enjoyed It, Meet Mr. Mulliner, Mr. Mulliner Speaking and the complete novel Leave it to Psmith.

Author(s): P. G. Wodehouse
Illustrator(s): None

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The Great Sermon Handicap (1933)

A Bertie Wooster and Jeeves story that originally appeared in The Inimitable Jeeves (Jeeves).

Author(s): P. G. Wodehouse
Illustrator(s): Unknown

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The Man with Two Left Feet (1933)

A collection of short stories that first appeared in magazines such as The Strand, The Saturday Evening Post, McClure’s and Collier’s. Bertie Wooster and Jeeves make their first appearance in ‘Extricating Young Gussie.’

Author(s): P. G. Wodehouse
Illustrator(s): Harry Beckhoff

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Brinkley Manor (1934)

Aunt Dahlia, Gussie Fink-Nottle, Madeline Bassett, Tuppy Glossop and Bertie and Jeeves -- what you might call a Wodehouse full house.

Author(s): P. G. Wodehouse
Illustrator(s): Unknown

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Right Ho, Jeeves (1934)

Aunt Dahlia, Gussie Fink-Nottle, Madeline Bassett, Tuppy Glossop and Bertie and Jeeves -- what you might call a Wodehouse full house.

Author(s): P. G. Wodehouse
Illustrator(s): Abbey

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Thank You, Jeeves (1934)

It all begins when Bertie Wooster decides to take up the banjolele seriously and Jeeves objects, leading to a parting of the ways, but they meet again in the chaos that is Chuffnell Regis, and after the banjolele is destroyed in an act of arson by Bertie’s new man, the rift in the lute is healed. Oh, and there are pairs of lovers and girls threatening to marry Bertie and an avenging father. Did I mention Sir Roderick Glossop was there as well? in black face?

Author(s): P. G. Wodehouse
Illustrator(s): Abbey

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Thank You, Jeeves! (1934)

It all begins when Bertie Wooster decides to take up the banjolele seriously and Jeeves objects, leading to a parting of the ways, but they meet again in the chaos that is Chuffnell Regis, and after the banjolele is destroyed in an act of arson by Bertie’s new man, the rift in the lute is healed. Oh, and there are pairs of lovers and girls threatening to marry Bertie and an avenging father. Did I mention Sir Roderick Glossop was there as well? in black face?

Author(s): P. G. Wodehouse
Illustrator(s): James Montgomery Flagg

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The Code of the Woosters (1938)

Bertie is commanded by his good aunt Dahlia to obtain, at all costs, including skulduggery, a silver cow creamer. At the same time he must guide the nuptials of Gussie Fink-Nottle and Madeline Bassett to a successful conclusion. Affairs are further complicated by Stiffy Byng, Stinker Pinker and assorted villains, including the infamous Spode. When all seems lost, Jeeves rides to the rescue.

Author(s): P. G. Wodehouse
Illustrator(s): Unknown

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The Code of the Woosters (1938)

Bertie is commanded by his good aunt Dahlia to obtain, at all costs, including skulduggery, a silver cow creamer. At the same time he must guide the nuptials of Gussie Fink-Nottle and Madeline Bassett to a successful conclusion. Affairs are further complicated by Stiffy Byng, Stinker Pinker and assorted villains, including the infamous Spode. When all seems lost, Jeeves rides to the rescue.

Author(s): P. G. Wodehouse
Illustrator(s): Unknown

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The Week-End Wodehouse (1939)

There is little overlap between the American and British titles of this name. The American edition contains stories from Young Men in Spats, Blandings Castle and Elsewhere, Mulliner Nights, The Inimitable Jeeves, Carry On, Jeeves!, Very Good, Jeeves, and The Crime Wave at Blandings and the complete novel Fish Preferred.

The British edition contains some of the short stories but also includes chapters from the novels.

Author(s): P. G. Wodehouse
Illustrator(s): Herbert F. Roese

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Week-End Wodehouse (1939)

There is little overlap between the American and British titles of this name. The American edition contains stories from Young Men in Spats, Blandings Castle and Elsewhere, Mulliner Nights, The Inimitable Jeeves, Carry On, Jeeves!, Very Good, Jeeves, and The Crime Wave at Blandings and the complete novel Fish Preferred.

The British edition contains some of the short stories but also includes chapters from the novels.

Author(s): P. G. Wodehouse
Illustrator(s): Kerr

Details »